The Worrinots: Blog posts

Sometimes as parents we’re so focused on getting everything right around the family, that we might forget to look within. 

It’s important to raise children that can be confident, show resilience and feel safe

Maybe we need to ask ourselves, is it addiction to games, or is it that children and young people are trying to satisfy their natural competitive need?  They don’t seem to get this need met in school when sports day is about the taking part and not the winning.  Maybe they’re taking ownership of that part of their natural development.

We like to think nothing unfortunate will happen to our own children, especially when it comes to their well-being and being kept safe.  The reality is though, things happen when we least expect it, and to the least likely person. 

When children are worried, they don’t like speaking about it. 

It’s certainly an interesting time to be a child of the 21st century generation, being brought up with technology at a young age, and grasping the concept of it early too. 

Stories like Dan’s is only one of the reasons The Worrinots exists, fortunately technology is available now to assist children who are experiencing the same childhood feelings Dan had.  Our aim is to prevent children reaching crisis point later in life.

I wonder how many people started having conversations with their children about starting new phases of their education early, or was it best to leave it until after you had your holiday, or just leave it until after our day out. 

Despite The Worrinots app winning gold at the UK App Awards, we need to do so much more if we're going to take the fight to children's mental health. But as our own experience shows, it’s not the digital native children we need to convince, it’s the digital immigrants; parents, teachers and government decision makers.

  • Do you have children between the ages of 5 – 11 years of age?
  • Ever wondered what your children worry about?
  • Do you have concern for their well-being?
  • Do you worry about who they can turn to?

Amongst other stats, research carried out by TES and This Morning revealed 76% of primary schools suggest there is no bullying in their schools. But on closer inspection I may be the only one but there seems to be some contradiction in the results. Are staff being honest with their answers or do they not want to admit there is a problem?