We often get asked lots of questions about The Worrinots, here’s the main ones we’ve answered for you.

It’s certainly an interesting time to be a child of the 21st century generation, being brought up with technology at a young age, and grasping the concept of it early too. 

Despite The Worrinots app winning gold at the UK App Awards, we need to do so much more if we're going to take the fight to children's mental health. But as our own experience shows, it’s not the digital native children we need to convince, it’s the digital immigrants; parents, teachers and government decision makers.

  • Do you have children between the ages of 5 – 11 years of age?
  • Ever wondered what your children worry about?
  • Do you have concern for their well-being?
  • Do you worry about who they can turn to?

Amongst other stats, research carried out by TES and This Morning revealed 76% of primary schools suggest there is no bullying in their schools. But on closer inspection I may be the only one but there seems to be some contradiction in the results. Are staff being honest with their answers or do they not want to admit there is a problem? 

I’m here if you ever need me”. We either heard it as a child, or have said something similar to a son, daughter, niece or nephew. We think we’re doing the right thing, and in part, we are. But rather than just an ear, children need coping mechanisms that they can implement. To rewrite a famous saying, don’t just give your child a fish that relieves their worries for a day. Give them a rod that will feed their wellbeing for a lifetime.

Children don’t always volunteer their feelings, we seem to have to second guess what’s troubling them. How can we stop our children suffering from small worries at such a young age, how can we stop their worries growing with them so they don’t reach crisis point in their teenage years? How can I know what my children are worried about and help them to overcome their fears? 

From Prince Harry's 20 year fight with mental health, Lady Gaga's PTSD, to J.K. Rowling's battle with depression, there are no shortage of high-profile figures raising awareness of mental health illnesses. So why is there is a shortage of effective solutions to help the growing number of children suffering with depression?

Coming to terms with the loss of a parent at the age of 12 is not something many of us can relate to. Having to cope with such grief in the public eye is simply unimaginable. So how did the Prince cope with the death of his mum, the Princess of Wales? The simple answer is, he didn't. In a very candid interview about his own struggles with mental health, the modern young royal spoke openly about how Diana's death affected his mental wellbeing from childhood. 

Recent studies and aging statistics show us children’s mental well-being needs to be given careful consideration and attention; charities with high profile backing are bringing the subject to the mainstream media.  Despite this issue in a technically driven world, no new solutions have been available to support children, until now.